2021 Undergraduate Research Day

The Space Grant will host three live zoom sessions the week of May 3rd during which our undergraduate research fellows will highlight their research with a 3-5 minute lightning talk followed by time for Q&A.  These sessions are scheduled from 5-6pm each night Monday, May 3rd, Wednesday, May 5th, and Thursday, May 6th and will feature 2-4 of our undergraduate research fellows.  The talks will be recorded and hosted on the Wyoming NASA Space Grant website after May 7th.

Monday, May 3rd (5-6pm) 

May 3 Space Grant UG Research Presentations

Join this presentation by clicking here!
Please note that the zoom will be password protected.  You will need to get the password from one of the student presenters or by emailing WSGC@uwyo.edu

Deana Sadrieva

A Better Way to Filter Water

There are filters all around us we use every day from the air we breathe to the water we drink. These filters come at a cost of using whether that be the size, energy, or the time they take up to achieve their purpose. My research focuses on creating a better water filter with chemistry, specifically for the ISS, where all these costs must be limited. To do this, the chemistry can be tailored to the specifications needed to provide clean water.

Michael Lindman

Cataloging and Classifying Stars That Drive Stellar Bow Shock Nebulae

My talk will briefly discuss stellar bow shock nebulae and what they are. I will then discuss the research we are conducting such as how we collect data, what data we collect, and what we have done and plan on doing with the data. Then I will discuss our future goals of this research.

 

 
Watch Deana’s research talk!
 
Watch Deana’s research talk!

Wednesday, May 5th (5-6pm) 

May 5 Space Grant UG Research Presentations

Join this presentation by clicking here!
Please note that the zoom will be password protected.  You will need to get the password from one of the student presenters or by emailing WSGC@uwyo.edu

Ethan Rowe

Wyoming Winter Active Arthropods; Effects of Temperature and Habitat on Species Composition and Activity

We evaluated the species composition of the snow surface arthropod community in Medicine Bow-Routt National Forest. These species can survive extreme cold conditions and are active throughout Wyoming’s winters. We determined the temperatures at which these arthropods are active, and how habitat type effects their activity.

 

Max Packebush

Parasites Infecting Bombus In the Intermountain Region

I will be discussing the impact of disease-causing microbial parasites in bumblebees and how my research aims to identify which microbes/bees are parasitizing/ being parasitized, respectively.

Kamaile DeLong

abstract

Thursday, May 6th (5-6pm) 

May 6 Space Grant UG Research Presentations

Join this presentation by clicking here!
Please note that the zoom will be password protected.  You will need to get the password from one of the student presenters or by emailing WSGC@uwyo.edu

Ivy Jay

Calculating Dispersion of Molecules at Equilibrium in an Excess of a Liquid Reactant Under a Pressure Difference.

My talk will center on my mathematical model of this phenomena and how it could be used. 

 

Jordan Williams

Gestating cow nutrition and its effect on her offspring’s feed efficiency

Fetal programming is widely recognized theory surround a lot of modern animal science research questions. In this project, we tested how fetal programming could play a role in calf feed efficiencies. Ultimately testing how the pregnant mother cow’s diet affected her calf’s feed efficiency in the long run. 

Mitchell Nelson

Fabrication of Perovskite Halide Thin Films via Inkjet Printing

Facile, swift, and large-scale fabrication of perovskite thin films has become a main focus in recent years within the semiconductor industry. Here, a commercialized fabrication method is explored, producing a spectrum of cesium lead halide perovskites for analysis.

 

Tyler Beddingfield

Crow Creek Riparian Project Update

Since the Wyoming Research Scholars Program Symposium in November 2020, the Crow Creek Riparian (CCR) Project has had several updates. This presentation will describe major accomplishments since then as well as the next steps. As this portion of the project comes to a close, the primary objectives are to finish all data processing tasks left, then compile all results for ease of access to project members. The final step will be to prepare a manuscript with the Principle Investigators.

 

Undergraduate Research: LiFT Project 

 

The LIFT Project is a multi-disciplinary outreach program, funded by the National Science Foundation, that brings together UW undergraduate students from science, engineering, and education backgrounds for the purpose of developing authentic K-12 scientific projects and curricula for high-altitude ballooning. 

 

Check back soon for videos from this year’s LiFT teams!