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Planetarium Public Show Schedule

PURCHASING TICKETS:

Tickets can be purchased in advance OR at the door.

To purchase tickets online with a credit card in advance:  Click here to purchase tickets online.  Please note that all online tickets are $4, but kids under 5 are still free. Tickets can be picked up at the door 15 minutes prior to the show.

To purchase tickets in person in advance:  Tickets can be purchased at the Physics Department main office in Physical Science room 204 Monday through Thursday from 8-5 and Friday from 8 -4 OR Online.  We can only accept cash or checks in person.

Finally, tickets can be purchased at theater 20 minutes before the show (cash or check only); $3 for student and $4 for non-students. Tickets for children under 5 are free.  Doors open 20 minutes before show. There is no admittance once the show starts.  Doors open 20 minutes before show.  There is no admittance once the show starts.

Saturday Shows

We are offering kid themed shows on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month followed by free activities for those interested in staying.  We are glad to have such a range of young children for our kid-themed shows! Parents, please understand that it can get a little noisy and chaotic at times with so many young kids in a darkened room. We appreciate any help in making these shows enjoyable for all!

December Public Show Schedule

As 2018 comes to a close, shows at the UW planetarium look deep into the furthest corners of our universe to see what there is to discover and how astronomers discover it.  Join us under the planetarium’s warm and cloudless December skies and wonder at the splendor of our universe.

Friday December 14th   

7:00pm            Star of the Magi                                                                      Duration: 60 minutes

The book of Matthew describes a “star that rose in the East” as leading “magi” to the birthplace of Jesus.  Could this star, depicted in artwork for nearly two thousand years, have been an astronomical event?  A supernova?  A comet?  A planetary conjunction with great significance?  Come speculate and learn about the heavens and wonder as astronomer Chip Kobulnicky presents celestial possibilities that may underlie this storied event.

Saturday December 15th     

4:00pm            Star of the Magi                                                                      Duration: 60 minutes

The book of Matthew describes a “star that rose in the East” as leading “magi” to the birthplace of Jesus.  Could this star, depicted in artwork for nearly two thousand years, have been an astronomical event?  A supernova?  A comet?  A planetary conjunction with great significance?  Come speculate and learn about the heavens and wonder as astronomer Chip Kobulnicky presents celestial possibilities that may underlie this storied event.

Tuesday December 18th

7:00pm Two Small Pieces of Glass                                                               Duration: 25 minutes

Galileo did not invent the telescope, but he was the first person to use the newly invented device to observe the sky. His two small pieces of glass revealed a Universe that was far more complex than previously assumed. Humanity now has large observatories and even telescopes in outer space!  Two Small Pieces of Glass shares the way telescope development has helped us understand our place in space.

Friday December 21st    

7:00pm            Mind-Blowing Astronomy                                                       Duration: 50 minutes

Stars the size of our solar system, time warping black holes, giant voids of nothing — these are just a few of the mind-boggling topics we will explore in this show. Get ready to have your socks knocked off with your new perspective of the Universe around you!

8:00-9:30pm  FREE Tour of our STAR Observatory

Join us any time tonight between 8:00 and 9:30pm on the roof of the Physical Sciences Building to tour our STAR Observatory.  Weather permitting, we will set up the telescopes to peer closer into the evening sky.  Please be sure to dress warm as evenings are chilly!

Saturday December 22nd

11:00am          The Center of Our Galaxy: Stars and Black Holes                Duration: 40 minutes

Stars and Black holes are two of the most fascinating objects we see in space — both to casual observers and scientists. This show will explore how stars and black holes work, and how they affect the Milky Way galaxy.

After show activity: Chromatography Ornaments

The Planetarium will be resuming our usual schedule on January 4th!

January 2019 Public Show Schedule

Happy New Year!  Classes have not yet started at the University, but the planetarium is open to the public for our Tuesday, Friday, and Saturday shows.  Check out our New Year schedule and join us at the planetarium this month to explore the hidden treasures of the night sky!

Friday January 4th

7:00pm            The Power of a Zero                                                               Duration: 50 minutes

Orders of magnitude: the lens through which astrophysicists see the world is hinged upon one zero. Tonight, we’ll explore our universe one order of magnitude at a time, from the smallest of the small, to the entire universe as a whole.

8:00-9:30pm  FREE Tour of our STAR Observatory

Join us any time tonight between 8:00 and 9:30pm on the roof of the Physical Sciences Building to tour our STAR Observatory.  Weather permitting, we will set up the telescopes to peer closer into the evening sky.  Please be sure to dress warm as evenings are chilly!

Tuesday January 8th         

7:00pm  This Month’s Sky                                                                               Duration: 45 minutes

As the months and seasons change here in Wyoming, new astronomical events occur in our nighttime sky.  From constellations to meteor showers to visible planets, This Month’s Sky acts as your guide to observing these remarkable events.

Friday January 11th             

7:00pm   E.T. and the Search for Extraterrestrial Life          Duration: 50 minutes

Good space science fiction usually involves alien life, and yet so far astronomers have not found signs of ET. Could intelligent life exist and be near enough to contact us? Join us as we tour the possibilities in our own solar system and beyond.

Saturday January 12th      

11:00am          How we Blew up Pluto                                                            Duration: 40 minutes

Originally discovered in 1930, Pluto was a tiny planet on the edge of our solar system. Since 2006, however, the International Astronomical Union has reclassified Pluto as a “dwarf planet”. Today we will remember Pluto’s days as a planet, and explore the reasons for its reclassification.

Activity: An Exploration of Light and Color

Tuesday January 15th

7:00pm  Light and Dark Double Feature: Seeing and Phantom of the Universe

Duration: 45 minutes

Seeing – Ride a photon from its creation and journey across the galaxy to your mind’s eye.  From there, witness the conversion to an electro-chemical impulse that travels the neuro pathways of the brain to create the image your brain sees.

Phantom of the Universe: the Hunt for Dark Matter –This full-dome planetarium movie reveals the first hints of dark matter’s existence through the eyes of Fritz Zwicky, the scientist who coined the term “dark matter.” Tonight, audiences explore all that we know and all there is still to learn about the Phantom of the Universe.

Friday January 18th     

7:00pm            Constellations Across Cultures                                               Duration: 50 minutes

Many of us are familiar with Orion, the Zodiac, and several other Ancient Greek Constellations, but the ancient Greeks were not the only culture to make science and stories from the stars. Join us as we travel around the world, exploring the cultural and scientific significance of the night sky to the Incas, the Aboriginal people of Australia, and more.

8:00-9:30pm  FREE Tour of our STAR Observatory

Join us any time tonight between 8:00 and 9:30pm on the roof of the Physical Sciences Building to tour our STAR Observatory.  Weather permitting, we will set up the telescopes to peer closer into the evening sky.  Please be sure to dress warm as evenings are chilly!

Tuesday January 22nd

7:00pm  Light and Dark Double Feature: Seeing and Phantom of the Universe

Duration: 45 minutes

Seeing – Ride a photon from its creation and journey across the galaxy to your mind’s eye.  From there, witness the conversion to an electro-chemical impulse that travels the neuro pathways of the brain to create the image your brain sees.

Phantom of the Universe: the Hunt for Dark Matter –This full-dome planetarium movie reveals the first hints of dark matter’s existence through the eyes of Fritz Zwicky, the scientist who coined the term “dark matter.” Tonight, audiences explore all that we know and all there is still to learn about the Phantom of the Universe.

Friday January 25th

7:00pm            Jupiter the Colossal!                                                  Duration: 50 minutes

Jupiter is more than just a planet; it is the center of the largest collection of moons in our solar system.  Join us tonight to explore the largest planet in the solar system and uncover the fascinating secrets of its moons.

Saturday January 26th  

11:00am          Ice Giants                                                                    Duration: 40 minutes

After decades of studying Uranus and Neptune we’ve uncovered some amazing features of these mysterious ice giant planets, but these answers leave us with even more intriguing questions. Come this Saturday to see and learn about the icy hidden gems of our own solar system!

Activity: Solar System Scale Model

Tuesday January 29th

7:00pm            Distant Worlds – Alien Life?                                                 Duration: 50 minutes

Does alien life exist out there? In this show, we journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop – starting with life here on Earth, moving out to the rest of our solar system, and travelling on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.