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Planetarium Public Show Schedule

PURCHASING TICKETS:

Tickets can be purchased in advance OR at the door.

Purchase tickets online with a credit card.  Please note that online tickets sales close at 4:00pm on the show date (Friday for Saturday shows) and all online tickets are $4, but kids under 5 are still free. Tickets will be available for pickup in the planetarium 20 minutes prior to the show.

To purchase tickets in person in advance:  Tickets can be purchased at the Physics Department main office in Physical Science room 204 Monday through Thursday from 8-5 and Friday from 8 -4 .  We can only accept cash or checks in person.

Finally, tickets can be purchased in the planetarium 20 minutes before the show (cash or check only); $3 for student and $4 for non-students. Tickets for children under 5 are free.

Doors open 20 minutes before show and close when the show starts. There is no admittance once the show starts.

Saturday Shows

We are offering kid themed shows on the second and fourth Saturdays of the month followed by free activities for those interested in staying.  We are glad to have such a range of young children for our kid-themed shows! Parents, please understand that it can get a little noisy and chaotic at times with so many young kids in a darkened room. We appreciate any help in making these shows enjoyable for all!

February Public Show Schedule

Welcome back Students!  Interested in exploring a little more about our home state?  The solar system?  What makes up the galaxy?  Join us at the UW planetarium to explore Wyoming, the universe, and everything in-between.

Tuesday February 19th  

7:00pm            Double Feature: Mayan Archaeoastronomy and From Earth to the Universe                                                Duration: 50 minutes

Mayan Archaeoastronomy: Observers of the Universe is unique among planetarium shows, intertwining science and mythology to take the viewer on a poetic journey through how the Mayans have viewed and understood the Universe throughout their history.

A desire to comprehend the Universe may well be humanity’s oldest shared intellectual experience. Yet only recently have we truly begun to grasp our place in the vast cosmos. To learn about this journey of celestial discovery, from the theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes, we invite you to experience From Earth to the Universe.

Friday February 22nd

7:00pm            Native American Skies                                                           Duration: 50 minutes

Currently 88 official constellations piece together the stars, most with a story dating back to Greek mythology. However, the Greeks were not the only civilization to observe and tell stories in stars. In fact, every ancient society looked to the sky and were inspired by its beauty.  Tonight’s show takes a look close to home to honor the Northern Native American culture and their night sky.

Saturday February 23rd   

11:00am          Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star                                                    Duration: 40 minutes

Have you ever wondered where stars come from and what happens at the end of their life cycle? What are they made of or why some are different colors? How do you recognize them in the sky, and why are they important to astronomy? Today, we will explore the answers to these stellar questions and more!

Activity: 2D and 3D Constellations

Tuesday February 26th

7:00pm            Double Feature: Mayan Archaeoastronomy and From Earth to the Universe                                                Duration: 50 minutes

Mayan Archaeoastronomy: Observers of the Universe is unique among planetarium shows, intertwining science and mythology to take the viewer on a poetic journey through how the Mayans have viewed and understood the Universe throughout their history.

A desire to comprehend the Universe may well be humanity’s oldest shared intellectual experience. Yet only recently have we truly begun to grasp our place in the vast cosmos. To learn about this journey of celestial discovery, from the theories of the ancient Greek astronomers to today’s grandest telescopes, we invite you to experience From Earth to the Universe.

Wednesday February 27th

6:30pm           Here comes the Sun: A look at the science and engineering behind NASA’s Parker Solar Probe                                      Duration: 60 minutes

Presented by Dr. Bill Rice, this Parker Solar Probe presentation at the UW Planetarium will start at 6:30pm. Please note that this is a FREE event.

The sun has captivated our imaginations and curiosity for millennia.  Considered to be a deity in numerous civilizations and then later the subject of great debates on its position in our solar system to now a critical part of our renewable-energy portfolio, the sun serves a central role in humanity.  In this discussion, Dr. Bill Rice will present an overview of the science behind what makes the sun tick, including still-yet-unresolved questions regarding its structure (e.g., solar corona physics).  Next, Dr. Rice will discuss the goals of NASA’s recently launched Parker Solar Probe mission, as well as the materials engineering behind this impressive spacecraft.  Incredibly, while the Parker Solar Probe will be sent extremely close to the sun (within 20 solar radii), reaching temperatures of 2500°F (1371°C), the measurement instruments on board will stay a reasonable ~70°F (20°C)!  With the probe just reaching its stable trajectory in November 2018, much of the Parker Probe data will be collected and sent throughout 2019, which makes this an exciting time to understand the importance of this mission, its incredible engineering, and how all of it relates to us back on earth.

Keep an eye out for our March schedule, to be released later this week!