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Planetarium show schedule

NOVEMBER

 

Nights grow longer in Wyoming’s winter months and (despite the chill) display beautiful constellations and a famous annual meteor shower.  Be sure to bundle up and catch a glimpse of our stunning night sky this month.  To see beyond the evening sky, join us at the UW Planetarium to explore what our eyes cannot see.  From the stages of the stellar life cycle, to the beauty of the Southern skies, and on to cosmic objects too small or distant to see from Earth, this November at the planetarium helps you to observe more than meets the eye in our evening skies.

 

Friday November 3rd  

 

7:00pm  Stellar Evolution in Our Winter Skies                                                  Duration: 50 minutes

 

If you go out star-gazing this month, you may find a popular shape or two.  Both the Big Dipper and Orion will be visible in our November evening skies.  While looking at these famous constellations, you are also seeing the various stages in the stellar life cycle as stars form, shine, and eventually run out of fuel in the galaxy.  Join us tonight to discover that our favorite constellations contain more than meets the eye.

 

8:00pm  FREE Tour of our STAR Observatory                                Duration: Weather Dependent

 

Saturday November 4th

 

11:00am Distant Worlds – Alien Life?                     Duration: 40 minutes

 

When we look up at the night sky, we are looking out into the Universe. Does alien life exist out there? In this show, we will journey outward to see what it takes for life to develop – starting with life here on Earth and moving out to the rest of our solar system and on to alien planets that orbit distant stars in our galaxy.  What might be essential for alien life on distant moons or planets, and how could we detect it?

Tuesday November 7th

 

7:00pm  This Month’s Sky                                                                                 Duration: 45 minutes

 

As the months and seasons change here in Wyoming, new astronomical events occur in our nighttime sky.  No matter what time of year, there is always something to see after the Sun goes down.  From constellations to meteor showers to visible planets, This Month’s Sky acts as your guide to these remarkable events and where to find them.

 

Thursday November 9th

 

7:00pm  Aboriginal Skies: Land of the Lightning People                      Duration: 90 minutes

 

Tonight, the UW Planetarium hosts a special event presented by Paul Taylor, an Australian storyteller and educator.  In Aboriginal Skies Paul Taylor explores the creation story and ancient rock art describing Aboriginal beliefs about the heavens. Tonight will discover the sky the way the Wardaman view it, based on research done with Bill Yidumduma Harney, Senior Elder of the Wardaman people of the Northern Territory in Australia.

 

Friday November 10th

 

7:00pm  Aboriginal Skies: Land of the Lightning People                      Duration: 90 minutes

 

Tonight, the UW Planetarium hosts a special event presented by Paul Taylor, an Australian storyteller and educator.  In Aboriginal Skies Paul Taylor explores the creation story and ancient rock art describing Aboriginal beliefs about the heavens. Tonight will discover the sky the way the Wardaman view it, based on research done with Bill Yidumduma Harney, Senior Elder of the Wardaman people of the Northern Territory in Australia.

 

8:30pm  FREE Tour of our STAR Observatory                                Duration: Weather Dependent

 

Tuesday November 14th

 

7:00pm  Seeing                                                                          Duration: 30 minutes

 

Ride a photon across the galaxy to your mind’s eye and experience how we see.  SEEING! follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye. From there, witness the conversion to an electro-chemical impulse that then travels the neuro pathways of the brain to the various centers that create the image the brain sees.

 

Friday November 17th

 

7:00pm  Race to the Moon                                            Duration: 50 minutes

 

October 4th celebrated the 60th anniversary of mankind’s first step into space. Sputnik, the first artificial satellite to orbit the Earth, launched in 1957.  The launch of Sputnik also marked the start of the Space Race, with the USSR in the lead.  Tonight’s show will explore the Race to the Moon between the United States and Soviet Union, who eventually won the Space Race and why, and current and future plans to continue manned exploration of our solar system.

 

Saturday November 18th

 

11:00am Tour the Solar System: Beyond the Planets                         Duration: 40 minutes

 

Not just the Sun, planets, and moons but comets, asteroids and more!  There is so much in the Earth’s cosmic neighborhood to explore!  Come with us as we take a tour of our solar system – starting at the Sun and ending at the edge of solar system. See and learn about all the objects familiar and unfamiliar that orbit around the Sun!  After the show, we will explore the scale of our solar system, from the Sun to the Earth, out to Pluto and beyond!

 

Tuesday November 21st

 

7:00pm  This Month’s Sky                                                                                 Duration: 45 minutes

 

As the months and seasons change here in Wyoming, new astronomical events occur in our nighttime sky.  No matter what time of year, there is always something to see after the Sun goes down.  From constellations to meteor showers to visible planets, This Month’s Sky acts as your guide to these remarkable events and where to find them.

 

The Planetarium will be closed on Friday November 24th for the Thanksgiving Weekend.  Gobble, gobble!

 

Tuesday November 28th

 

7:00pm  Seeing                                                                          Duration: 30 minutes

 

Ride a photon across the galaxy to your mind’s eye and experience how we see.  SEEING! follows a photon’s creation and journey across the galaxy to a young stargazer’s eye. From there, witness the conversion to an electro-chemical impulse that then travels the neuro pathways of the brain to the various centers that create the image the brain sees.